Nov 28

Turkey Bowl 2008

2008 at 10:45 pm   |   by Janelle Bradshaw Filed under Fun & Encouragement | Girltalkers | Homemaking | Holidays

This year’s Turkey Bowl quickly turned in to a rout (35-14). Although Dad was quarterback for both teams, he refused to appear in the picture with the losing team citing the inferior play of certain team members. Despite being on the losing team (for the record: we had distinct field position disadvantage always having to go up hill) we had tons of fun!
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Nov 27

Come Ye Thankful People

2008 at 11:49 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Homemaking | Holidays

Stockxpertcom_id26421461_jpg_8149cb COME, YE THANKFUL PEOPLE, COME

Come ye thankful people come,
Raise the song of harvest home!
All is safely gathered in,
Ere the winter storms begin;
God our Maker, doth provide
For our wants to be supplied:
Come to God’s own temple, come,
Raise the song of harvest home.

All the world is God’s own field
Fruit unto his praise to yield;
Wheat and tares together sown
Unto joy or sorrow grown;
First the blade, and then the ear,
Then the full corn shall appear;
Lord of the harvest! grant that we
Wholesome grain and pure may be.

God shall come,
And shall take his harvest home;
From his field shall in that day
All offenses purge away,
Give his angels charge at last
In the fire the tares to cast;
But the fruitful ears to store
In his garner evermore.

Even so, Lord, quickly come,
Bring thy final harvest home;
Gather thou thy people in,
Free from sorrow, free from sin,
There, forever purified,
in thy presence to abide;
Come, with all thine angels, come,
Raise the glorious harvest home.

Words: Henry Alford, Music: George J. Elvey

Nov 25

Thanksgiving Funnies x2

2008 at 3:26 pm   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Homemaking | Holidays

Stockxpertcom_id26421461_jpg_8149cb Another classic Thanksgiving Friday Funny, from Gloria this time…

PREGNANT TURKEY STORY

One year at Thanksgiving, my mom went to my sister’s house for the traditional feast.
Knowing how gullible my sister is, my mom decided to play a trick.
She told my sister that she needed something from the store.
When my sister left, my mom took the turkey out of the oven, removed the stuffing, stuffed a Cornish hen, and inserted it into the turkey, and re-stuffed the turkey. She then placed the bird(s) back in the oven.
When it was time for dinner, my sister pulled the turkey out of the oven and proceeded to remove the stuffing. When her serving spoon hit something, she reached in and pulled out the little bird.
With a look of total shock on her face, my mother exclaimed, “Patricia, you’ve cooked a pregnant bird!” At the realization of this horrifying news, my sister started to cry.
It took the family two hours to convince her that turkeys lay eggs!
Yep…she’s blonde!

Nov 24

Thanksgiving Funnies

2008 at 6:40 pm   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Homemaking | Holidays

Stockxpertcom_id26421461_jpg_8149cb The bustle of Thanksgiving week is upon us. We’re shopping and cooking and hoping this year’s dinner turns out better than last year’s. To give you a few laughs in the midst of all your busy preparations we’ll post a few Thanksgiving-themed “Friday Funnies” this week. This first hilarious yet cautionary tale is from Carol.

Thanking God for the gift of laughter…

Nicole for the girltalkers

THE GOOD NAPKINS…ahhhhh…the joys of having girls…

My mother taught me to read when I was four years old (her first mistake)....

One day, I was in the bathroom and noticed one of the cabinet doors was ajar. I read the box in the cabinet. I then asked my mother why she was keeping ‘napkins’ in the bathroom. Didn’t they belong in the kitchen?

Not wanting to burden me with unnecessary facts, she told me that those were for “special occasions” (her second mistake)...

Now, fast forward a few months….It’s Thanksgiving Day, and my folks are leaving to pick up my uncle and his wife for dinner. Mom had assignments for all of us while they were gone. Mine was to set the table.

When they returned, my uncle came in first and immediately burst into laughter.

Next, in came his wife who gasped, then began giggling.

Next, in came my father, who roared with laughter.

Then in came Mom, who almost died of embarrassment when she saw each place setting on the table with a “special occasion” napkin at each plate, with the fork carefully arranged on top. I had even tucked the little tail in so they didn’t hang off the edge!!

My mother asked me why I used these and, of course, my response sent the other adults into further fits of laughter.

“But, Mom, you SAID they were for special occasions!!!” Isn’t it easier to just tell the truth and be careful who you ask to set the table for you!

Nov 21

Our Mothering Forecast

2008 at 11:48 am   |   by Carolyn Mahaney Filed under Motherhood

What’s the future for your kids look like today?

Perhaps your home is a place of peace and tranquility, your fears as insignificant as gnats to swat away.

Or maybe trials are washing over you like relentless waves. Your anxieties are consuming and overwhelming. They rob you of sleep and plague your waking hours. But no matter the size or shape of your fears, may I encourage you to take them to the foot of the cross?

The gospel isn’t an out-of-date message; it is the good news of a saving God who is “a very present help in trouble” (Ps. 46:1). So repent from worry and put your trust in the glorious gospel.

My husband has a Charles Spurgeon quotation as his screensaver, which we would do well to have running across the screen of our minds: “As for His failing you, never dream of it—hate the thought. The God who has been sufficient until now, should be trusted to the end.”

So let our mothering forecast be one of victory and not of defeat. We have the hope of the gospel in our souls.

Nov 20

A Mother’s Hope

2008 at 2:32 pm   |   by Carolyn Mahaney Filed under Biblical Womanhood | Gospel | Motherhood

As mothers who have trusted in Jesus Christ, we have the hope of the gospel.

The gospel begins with some bad news. It confirms the fact that we are all sinful, rebellious creatures. Rebellion is not unique to children today. In Psalm 51, King David laments, “Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me” (v. 5).

But the gospel doesn’t leave us with bad news. The message of the gospel is that Jesus Christ has come to save rebellious sinners: mothers and children. He lived a perfect, rebellion-free life, fully submitted to His Father, and died a cruel death as our substitute. Then He rose from the dead and is seated now at the right hand of God, the Father.

The truth of Christ’s life, death, and resurrection is our hope as mothers. In his book, Shepherding a Child’s Heart, Tedd Tripp concurs:

“You have reason for hope as parents who desire to see your children have faith. The hope is in the power of the gospel. The gospel is suited to the human condition. The gospel is attractive. God has already shown great mercy to your children. He has given them a place of rich privilege. He has placed them in a home where they have heard His truth. They have seen the transforming power of grace in the lives of His people. Your prayer and expectation is that the gospel will overcome their resistance as it has yours.”

The gospel message should provide us with tremendous heart-strengthening, soul-encouraging hope: Jesus Christ is “mighty to save” (Isa. 63:1).

Nov 19

The Successful Mother

2008 at 2:55 pm   |   by Carolyn Mahaney Filed under Motherhood

Faith toward God is the foundation of effective mothering. Success as a mother doesn’t begin with hard work or sound principles or consistent discipline (as necessary as these are). It begins with God: His character, His faithfulness, His promises, His sovereignty. And as our understanding of these truths increases, so will our faith for mothering.

You see, it is relatively easy to implement new practices in parenting. But if our practices (no matter how useful) aren’t motivated by faith, they will be fruitless.

The Bible says that without faith it is impossible to please God (Heb 11:6). Fear is sin. And as my husband has often graciously reminded me—God is not sympathetic with my unbelief.

Why? Because fear, worry, and unbelief say to God that we don’t really believe He is “merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness” (Ps. 86:15). We are calling God a liar.

Even in the most trying situations with our children, we have much more incentive to trust than to fear, much more cause for peace and joy than despair. That’s because, as Christians, we have the hope of the gospel.

Nov 18

What I Wish I’d Done

2008 at 4:50 pm   |   by Carolyn Mahaney Filed under Motherhood

Many years after this fear-prompting meal, I was faced with another question. This time, CJ and I, along with Nicole and Janelle (Kristin was living in Chicago at the time) were being interviewed at a parents’ meeting at our church. The moderator asked CJ and me, “If you could parent your daughters all over again, what would you do differently?”

It was not a tough question. While I am aware of numerous ways I would want to be a better mom, one thing stands out far ahead of the rest.

I wish I had trusted God more.

For every fearful peek into the future, I wish I had looked to Christ instead. For each imaginary trouble conjured up, I wish I had recalled the specific, unfailing faithfulness of God. In place of dismay and dread, I wish I had exhibited hope and joy. I wish I had approached mothering like the preacher Charles Spurgeon approached his job: “forecasting victory, not foreboding defeat.”

What mothering failures have you predicted lately? What fears about your children lurk around the edges of your mind—or even dominate your thoughts? Do you assume things will only get worse? Are you anxious about the future and tempted to despair?

As women, we’re all vulnerable to fear, worry, and anxiety. And few areas tempt us more than mothering. But faith must dictate our mothering, not fear. Faith, as it says in Hebrews is the ‘assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen’” (Heb 11.1).

Faith toward God is the foundation of effective mothering.

More tomorrow…