Oct 21

“Bring Them to Me”

2010 at 3:15 pm   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Biblical Womanhood | Fear & Anxiety | Motherhood

“Children are a precious gift from God, but much anxiety comes with them. They may be a great joy or a great bitterness to their parents….In all cases, the Word of God gives us one receipt for the curing of all their ills, ‘Bring him unto me.’ O for more agonizing prayer on their behalf while they are yet babes! Sin is there, let our prayers begin to attack it….Never must we cease to pray until they cease to breathe. No case is hopeless while Jesus lives.

The Lord sometimes suffers His people to be driven into a corner that they may experimentally know how necessary He is to them. Ungodly children, when they show us our own powerlessness against the depravity of their hearts, drive us to flee to the strong for strength, and this is a great blessing to us. Whatever our…need may be, let it like a strong current bear us to the ocean of divine love. Jesus can soon remove our sorrow, He delights to comfort us. Let us hasten to Him while He waits to meet us.”

~Charles Spurgeon, Morning and Evening, September 17, Morning

Oct 20

At Our Wits’ End

2010 at 3:19 pm   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Biblical Womanhood | Fear & Anxiety | Motherhood

“I cried to thee, O Lord.” Ps. 30:8

“Prayer is the unfailing resource of the anxious mother,” to paraphrase Charles Spurgeon:


“If they are driven to their wits’ end, they may still go to the mercy-seat….Let us never forget to pray, and let us never doubt the success of prayer… Mirth and carnal amusements are a sorry prescription for a mind distracted and despairing. Prayer will succeed where all else fails.”


We are often “at our wits’ end” with our children. We feel like we’ve tried everything and we don’t know what else to do. So we worry: Will my toddler never stop throwing temper tantrums? Will my teenager ever open up to me again? Will my children ever turn to Christ?

But instead of worrying, we are to cry to the Lord on behalf of our children. We must not forget to pray. And we must believe that prayer works: it will succeed where all our mothering efforts fail.

What worries do you need to bring to the mercy-seat today?

“They…were at their wits’ end. Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble, and he delivered them from their distress.” Ps. 107:27, 28

(adapted from the archives)

Oct 19

How to Survive a Busy Season

2010 at 3:15 pm   |   by Girl Talk

Stockxpertcom_id264927_size1 Whew! After devotions, exercise, grocery store run, beds made, dishes done, house straightened, laundry underway, Chad homeschooled, soccer carpool completed, editing project for my husband finished—I can finally attempt to write a post

Life is busy!

And it’s not just me. Whether you are a student, holding down a job, or caring for a family—the fall season unfailingly fills our lives with lots to do.

So what does it look like to glorify God in the midst of a busy season?

The first must-have to survive—and even thrive—during busy seasons: humility.

I still remember the wise and helpful counsel my husband CJ shared with me many years ago when I was having one of those “I just can’t get it all done” breakdown crying sessions. When he finally got the chance to speak, he said: “Carolyn, only God completes His to-do list. We are not God. We are finite creatures with serious limitations. Therefore we need to humble ourselves by accepting our limitations and draw upon God’s strength to simply do what we can.” CJ’s advice not only helped me then, but continues to benefit me to this day.

Here are 3 simple ways we can be mindful of our limitations as we make our to-do lists these days:

1. Separate the-really-do-matter items from the really-don’t-matter items—of course doing the really-do-matter items first.
2. Simplify the really-do-matter items where possible. (e.g. pizza for dinner or store-bought cookies for entertaining.)
3. Trust God for all the things on the list that don’t get done.

Let’s honor God by responding to our “endless” list of to-dos with humility—joyfully accepting our limitations and simply doing what we can.

(reprinted from the archives)