girltalk Blog

Nov 18

A Game-Plan for Handling Holiday Emotions

2014 at 7:51 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Biblical Womanhood | Emotions | Homemaking | Holidays

Today the girltalkers are sitting down over lunch (maybe leftover chicken and orzo or a couple of roast beef sandwiches from Arby’s—Janelle’s still deciding on the menu) to plan Thanksgiving. Yes, we’re a little early on the Christmas music and late on the Thanksgiving planning this year, but we’ll pull it together.

Holiday planning is essential. We plan menus and seating arrangements, we make lists of gifts to get and to give. But there’s one holiday event we often fail to plan for, and that is our feelings.

The holidays stir up feelings we thought were ancient history, feelings that only seem to surface this time of year and if we aren’t prepared, our emotions can end up running (even ruining) the holidays.

Anxiety spikes over the holidays. Will the children like their presents? Will the turkey be moist and will the gravy thicken? Is the family going to get along?

When life is hard and we are down, we feel bitter and resentful of holiday cheer. Maybe Scrooge had a point.

Disappointments litter the holiday season. Your daughter couldn’t come for Christmas. The party wasn’t a huge success. Your husband wasn’t as excited about his present as you’d hoped.

Envy and jealousy rear their ugly heads this time of year. You were reasonably content until you had to spend an evening listening to your cousin talk about her new house and her amazing church and her wonderful kids.

We feel stressed about all the work and irritable because no one is helping us do it.

Feelings of judgment and anger (you thought you’d repented from) are rekindled along with the yuletide fire. Guilt is served up like a side dish.

Many of us feel happy and excited over the holidays, only to get hit with a bad case of post-holiday blues.

For some, the holidays bring a sharp stab of pain and sadness from the loss of a loved one.

How do we deal with our holiday feelings? There’s a ton of advice out there, but as Christian women, we have a higher goal. We want to glorify God with our holiday feelings. We want to rejoice in our Savior’s birth. We want to have hearts full of gratitude for the gift of salvation.

We have a higher goal, and we also have a greater hope. Our hope is in our Savior, who has rescued us from the wrath of God and forgiven us from our sins. Our hope is in the Holy Spirit who is active in our hearts this holiday season to help us rejoice in Jesus Christ.

How can we experience God-glorifying emotions this holiday? Let’s receive wisdom from God’s Word to make a plan.

Nov 17

“Prepare Him Room”  Winners

2014 at 8:14 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Resource Recommendations | Homemaking | Holidays

Thanks to everyone for the great children’s book suggestions for Christmas! Our winner is Meredith, who wrote to tell us how a book we know and love is actually perfect for Advent:

My favourite Advent resource for children is Sally Lloyd-Jones’ very wonderful The Jesus Story Book Bible The format of this children’s Bible is such that there are twenty one stories presented from the Old Testament (each of which “whisper Jesus’ name”) and then the Christmas story is presented in the first three stories in the New Testament section. That makes twenty four stories that will paint an Old Testament backdrop to the birth of Jesus and then tell the story of his birth. Twenty four superb readings to do with children - one a day - during the month of December leading up to Christmas. Isn’t that amazing? Made this happy discovery a few years ago.

Love it, Meredith. Thank you!

Our runners up are Shea and Jaime who both recommended another book by Sally Lloyd-Jones: Song of the Stars: A Christmas Story

We’ll send all three of you a Prepare Him Room cd right away. Enjoy!

Nov 13

Christmas Music, Advent Reading, and a Giveaway

2014 at 7:13 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Homemaking | Holidays

Here at girltalk, we’ve been breaking all the rules and listening to Christmas music for a few weeks now. The new Prepare Him Room album is just that good!

We’d love to give one of you a complimentary cd as an early Christmas present. Write and tell us your favorite Christmas book for children (we are always looking for new ideas!) and we’ll enter you in the drawing.

Also, in preparation for Advent, here are a few ideas:

1. The new Advent devotional for families by Marty Machowski, which pairs with the Prepare Him Room cd.

2. The Good Book Company is my go-to source for advent calendars, and they have a new children’s book and calendar this year, The Christmas Promise.

3. Last year, we published a read-aloud list for kids with stories for every day of December (I’m hoping to add to that list from your ideas!).

P.S. Look for the much-requested CJ’s Christmas Gift Book List next week!

Sep 30

New Album: Prepare Him Room

2014 at 5:20 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Biblical Womanhood | Gospel | Homemaking | Holidays

My kids are shocked (as they are every year) to find Christmas stuff out in the stores in September. But this year Christmas will come a little early to the Whitacre home too, because yesterday was the release of the new Sovereign Grace Christmas Album: Prepare Him Room: Celebrating the Birth of Jesus in Song.

The reality of the incarnation, the Son of God taking on our flesh and bones to save us, will be an eternal source of wonder, gratefulness, and joy. These fourteen songs are an attempt to capture that mystery in song.

This album is unique in that it accompanies a family devotional and classroom curriculum written by Marty Machowski which are designed to build gospel hope and enduring theological depth into your celebration of Christmas. You can find more information on those here:

Prepare Him Room: Celebrating the Birth of Jesus Family Devotional

Prepare Him Room: Celebrating the Birth of Jesus in the Classroom

You can purchase the album here and watch promotional acoustic videos on youtube here. You’re going to love it!

Jun 16

Housekeeping is Not Boring

2014 at 8:44 am   |   by Carolyn Mahaney Filed under Homemaking

“It is scarcely surprising, then, that so many people imagine housekeeping to be boring, frustrating, repetitive, unintelligent drudgery. I cannot agree. (In fact, having kept house, practiced law, taught, and done many other sorts of work, low- and high-paid, I can assure you that it is actually lawyers who are most familiar with the experience of unintelligent drudgery.)”

~Cheryl Mendelson, Home Comforts: The Art and Science of Keeping House

Feb 27

Raising Cookie Eaters

2014 at 3:13 pm   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Homemaking | Motherhood

In this insightful conversation between Rachel Jankovic (author of Fit to Burst) and her father, Douglas Wilson, Rachel explains where she wants her children to “grow up as cookie eaters instead of in the house with a cookie maker.”

Good stuff here about how to avoid falling into the ditch of resenting excellence in the home or the other ditch of pursuing excellence in the home for your own glory:

“Making cookies I’m all in favor of, but if you are making them about yourself and then trying to force them down everybody else’s throats “because I’m so good at this,” it doesn’t feed your children. But if you are making them because you want your children to be the kind of people who grew up eating cookies [and because] I want my children to have lived in a home that is ordered and pleasant to be in…if you are doing it that direction, I think it will feed your children.”

In the six minutes it takes for you to bake a batch of cookies you can watch this helpful video. Worth your time.

Motherhood & Work: Cleaning House and Cleaning Hearts, with Rachel Jankovic from Canon Wired on Vimeo.

Jan 27

The Opportunities of Housekeeping

2014 at 8:49 am   |   by Carolyn Mahaney Filed under Homemaking

“Seen from the outside, housework can look like a Sisyphean task that gives you no sense of reward or completion. Yet housekeeping actually offers more opportunities for savoring achievement than almost any other work I can think of. Each of its regular routines brings satisfaction when completed. These routines echo the rhythm of life, and the housekeeping rhythm is the rhythm of the body. You get satisfaction not only from the sense of order, cleanliness, freshness, peace and plenty restored, but from the knowledge that you yourself and those you care about are going to enjoy these benefits.” ~Cheryl Mendelson, Home Comforts: The Art and Science of Keeping House

Dec 23

kidtalk Christmas

2013 at 8:05 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Homemaking | Holidays

While you bake cookies or wrap presents with the kiddos today, here are four-fun filled episodes of a kid talk Christmas with Mr. B, Mrs. B, and Caly. Listen and rejoice!

Kids, are you ready for Christmas? Grab your Christmas snacks and gather ‘round to enjoy a one-of-a kind telling of the Christmas story with Mr. and Mrs. B. Merry Christmas boys and girls!

Dec 18

10 Ideas to Help Children Fight Greed at Christmastime

2013 at 9:18 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Fun & Encouragement | Girltalkers | Homemaking | Holidays | Motherhood

Christmastime puts parents in a tough spot. We love our children. We want to give them good gifts. We enjoy their eager anticipation and exuberant gift opening on Christmas morning. And yet as Christian parents, we know there is a dark side to gift giving: greed. All of the presents can seem little more than brightly wrapped packages of temptation. There are temptations to selfish delight or despair, depending on whether or not our children got what they wanted. Greed can take hold, turning what we intend as a blessing into what feels like a setback in our parenting.

So how do we give generously and squash greed at the same time? We girltalkers did some brainstorming and idea sharing and came up with ten ideas to get us all started.

1. Be Intentional. Greed won’t go away on its own; we’re gonna have to apply some parental elbow grease to this one. And it’s not a one-time thing, like “Do you remember the year we got rid of Christmas greed?” We’re going to be dealing with it for a while, so we have to resist the temptation to get angry or discouraged if it doesn’t seem like our efforts are bearing fruit right away.

2. Talk a Lot. Deuteronomy 6 is a great Christmas passage. We need to talk to our children about greed and gratefulness and what it means to glorify God at Christmas. It’s tempting to give up, because our instruction often seems to go in one ear and out the other, but we are called to be faithful.

My husband likes to have little Q&A sessions with the kids and throw in a ridiculous answer to make it memorable (broccoli often makes an appearance in these little conversations). Thus our Christmas Catechism sounds something like this:

Q. What is better than Getting?

A. Giving is better than Getting

Q. Why is it better than Getting?

A. Because that’s what Jesus did.

Q. What is better than Getting? (raise volume here)

A. Giving is better than Getting

3. Make Christmas Memories. Christmas traditions help direct a child’s anticipation toward activities and memory making and not only gift getting. This is one reason we love to celebrate Advent: it is a daily reminder that we are waiting for more than presents under the tree. Cookie baking, Christmas light viewing, and story reading all serve a similar purpose.

4. Make Christmas Giving Lists. In addition to Christmas lists for Mimi we have our kids make lists for what they want to give to family members. Then we let them loose in the Target dollar section to buy presents for their siblings and Daddy and Mommy. This is one of their favorite Christmas traditions, and it is fun to see their excitement channeled toward giving and away from getting.

5. Read Christmas Giving Stories. A great addition to Christmas story time: books that highlight the joy giving such as Little Women, The Gift of the Magi, If You’re Missing Baby Jesus, Christmas Day in the Morning and many more. Powerful stories can help awaken children’s imaginations to the magic of giving.

6. Give to People in Need. Involve your children in giving gifts to those who are in need or who are suffering at Christmastime. We enjoy buying presents for newly adopted children or contributing to a family’s adoption, but there are countless opportunities at Christmastime to give locally and around the world. Giving to others helps children take their eyes off themselves and understand how much they have to be grateful for.

7. Give the Gift of Experience. Along with toys, you can include gifts of experience under the tree: books, magazine subscriptions, memberships to a local museum, tickets to a special event, lessons for art or music, or (my favorite) a family trip or outing. Over time your children may come to anticipate these gifts most of all.

8. Minimize Temptation. In other words, hide the Christmas catalogs. Avoid spending long hours in the toy section at Target with your child. Limit exposure to holiday commercials. Redirect conversations that begin, “Do you know what I want for Christmas?” But don’t mess with the grandparents. Do the hard work of parenting so that Grandma and Grandpa can have the joy of being as generous as they desire.

9. Develop a Gift Opening Strategy. We like to open gifts slowly, one person, one gift at a time. This takes a while, but the slow pace helps restrain greed and promote gratefulness. We are training our children to pay attention when someone else is opening a gift and enter into their joy. And we also insist that our children give hugs and kisses and “big thank you’s” after opening each present. Having a strategy for gift giving that encourages patience, gratefulness, and a focus on others can counteract the greed that wants to own the day.

10. Cultivate Christ-like Character. We may have outgrown a childish greed for presents, but we as parents are still tempted to approach Christmas selfishly, for our own comfort or gratification. We need God’s grace to help us serve selflessly, give generously, parent patiently, and grow in passion for our Savior at Christmastime. As we grow to be more like Christ who “came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mt. 20:28) we will encourage our children to do the same.

Dec 13

Christmas Gifts for Children

2013 at 7:10 am   |   by Nicole Whitacre Filed under Homemaking | Holidays | Hospitality | Motherhood

For all you last-minute Christmas shoppers, here are a few gift ideas for the kiddos:

Sing the Bible with Slugs and Bugs

We are huge Slugs and Bugs fans around here and we’ve been waiting a long time for this album. Eighteen Scriptures set to some great music.

Bake Through the Bible

My parents gave us gifts that would make memories long after Christmas and this gift does just that. My girls are going to love trying some of these recipes.

God’s Great Plan

This book is beautifully written and illustrated to tell the storyline of the Bible. I plan to re-read it regularly to my children.

The Wingfeather Saga

I’m assuming you already know about these books from Andrew Peterson, but just in case one or two of you haven’t heard of them, I mention them here. My son has worn out books one through three and is counting down the days until the release of book four.

The Ashtown Burial Series

I’m also buying this series for my oldest, but to be honest, it’s really for me.

Thoughts to Make Your Heart Sing

From the beloved author and illustrator Sally Lloyd-Jones and illustrator Jago comes this exciting new book.